Any stuff about Shakespeare's plays, theatre itself, The Globe Theatre especially and brilliant actors of all times... Аnd many other things or objets d'art.

 

nataliakoptseva:

Van Gogh, Grass and Butterflies, 1887. Oil on canvas, 51 x 61 cm. Private collection

nataliakoptseva:

Van Gogh, Grass and Butterflies, 1887. Oil on canvas, 51 x 61 cm. Private collection

medievalistsnet:

Looking at the Viking Age - Bjarmaland. ~S
The medieval Scandinavian written sources locate Bjarmaland to the White Sea. The words Terfinna land connect the location with the Kola Peninsula and the environs of the Varzuga River whereas the name Gandvík guides our interest towards the Kantalahti Bay of the White Sea. The name Vína can be connected with either the Northern Dvina River or Viena Karelia. The Bjarmians as portrayed in the written sources seem to have been a permanently settled group of Baltic Fennic speaking people that lived in the north of Europe since the Viking Age (first mentioned in writing in the ninth century) until the early Middle Ages (mid-thirteenth century). They seem to have been involved in the international fur trade and had continuous contacts with Norwegians with both looting and trade as integral part of interaction.
http://www.medievalists.net/2014/04/06/bjarmaland-interaction-north-europe-viking-age-early-middle-ages/

medievalistsnet:

Looking at the Viking Age - Bjarmaland. ~S

The medieval Scandinavian written sources locate Bjarmaland to the White Sea. The words Terfinna land connect the location with the Kola Peninsula and the environs of the Varzuga River whereas the name Gandvík guides our interest towards the Kantalahti Bay of the White Sea. The name Vína can be connected with either the Northern Dvina River or Viena Karelia. The Bjarmians as portrayed in the written sources seem to have been a permanently settled group of Baltic Fennic speaking people that lived in the north of Europe since the Viking Age (first mentioned in writing in the ninth century) until the early Middle Ages (mid-thirteenth century). They seem to have been involved in the international fur trade and had continuous contacts with Norwegians with both looting and trade as integral part of interaction.

http://www.medievalists.net/2014/04/06/bjarmaland-interaction-north-europe-viking-age-early-middle-ages/

tiny-librarian:

These four miniatures date from around 1600 and were part of the ‘Bosworth Jewel’, which commemorated the start of Tudor rule after Henry VII’s victory over Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. The four portraits show Henry VIII’s father, Henry VII, founder of the Tudor dynasty; Henry VIII himself; Queen Jane Seymour; and their son Edward, later Edward VI. The Jewel was intended to show the continuation of the dynasty through Henry VIII to Prince Edward. It was presented to Charles I by Nicholas Hilliard’s son. The four miniatures were contained in an enamelled gold box which bore a depiction of the Battle of Bosworth on the lid. The Jewel seems to have been one of the items sold from the collection under Oliver Cromwell and, although the four miniatures had returned to royal ownership in the late seventeenth century, the box was lost. The four miniatures are now in Victorian frames.

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